DIY Acrylic/Glass Aquarium

Time to build something new
Forum rules
Before you start posting in this forum, will suggest you to go through the forum rules
HERE

Re: DIY Acrylic/Glass Aquarium

Postby Subroto » Tue Apr 09, 2013 10:14 am

mithun wrote:Whole sump top.. covering overflow as well will reduce noise too...

Any suggestions how to cover it up? Sealing the top permanently is out of question as we need access to the inside for servicing. Will duct taping the lid on top be the solution? I'll have to google this specific point, it seems.
mithun wrote:just turning off the CO2 solenoid will do it.. oxygen will be already enough if u run wet-dry filter/sump.

Hmmm..... you got a point there. The overnight pH stability may not be such a big problem as to warrant a second tank to support the first one.
mithun wrote:Ammonia is harmful for fishes and induces algae... Nitrate readily consumed by plants .. ammonia is not.. u are misinformed about this.. ammonia is broken into NO2 and then NO3- by bacteria then NO3- is consumed by plants..

I agree with the first part that Ammonia is harmful to fishes.

I disagree with the second part though. Plants rapidly detoxify ammonia, either by converting it to non-toxic ammonium (NH4+) or to use it immediately to synthesize proteins.

Briefly, the process of conversion takes place as follows : ammonia enters the plant cell by simple diffusion across the membrane and combines with a hydrogen ion to convert to non-toxic ammonium. This NH4+ can be stored in cell vacuoles. And in the second process, i.e., to use ammonia to synthesize proteins, ammonia is combined with stored carbohydrates to form ordinary amino acids.

Nitrate is not readily consumed by plants. It is your information that is not correct. Since we are both hobbyists without professional botanical background, I have to quote an authority here, Diana Walstad. "Most aquatic plants studied, when presented with a choice between ammonium and nitrates as their nitrogen source, take up ammonium exclusively. Only when ammonium is unavailable, do plants take up nitrates." (Ecology of the Planted Aquarium : A Practical Manual and Scientific Treatise for the Home Aquarist by Diana L. Walstad)(Italics mine).

Not only that, the nitrogen cycle that is carried out by our matured bio-filtration denies the plants access to ammonium and instead leaves nitrate as the end product of the cycle. I would quote, "Plants, algae, and all photosynthesizing organisms use the N of ammonium (not nitrate) to produce their proteins" (Lewis 1986, pp 34-41)(Italics mine). And from Diana Walstad again, "...when nitrifying bacteria convert ammonium to nitrates, plants are forced - at great energy - to convert nitrates back to ammonium." The cost to the plant in terms of energy spent to convert nitrate back in the two step reduction process is 83Kcal/mol which is a considerable waste and can be easily avoided by limiting the bio-filtration and progressively eliminating it altogether.

Thanks for the suggestion on the return line direction.

Happy fishkeeping!

Subroto
If we work for a living, why do we kill ourselves working?
User avatar
Subroto
New KAC Member
New KAC Member
 
Posts: 20
Joined: Sun Mar 24, 2013 10:47 am
Location: Algiers, Algeria
Has thanked: 0 time
Been thanked: 0 time

Share On:

Share on Facebook Facebook Share on Twitter Twitter Share on Orkut Orkut

Re: DIY Acrylic/Glass Aquarium

Postby mithun » Tue Apr 09, 2013 11:19 am

You do not need a air-tight fit cover for the top.. a gently placed glass slab on top of the sump is enough.. the loss of CO2 will not be significantly high. Also this will make sure some volume of air is excahnged to facilitate healthy wet-dry filtration.

First of all the above statement mostly applies for the terrestrial plants not aquatic. Ammonia cannot stay in pure gaseous form in water. It already makes NH4+ ion in water and plants need not take part in the process. Yes, NH4+ is a more reactive cation than less reactive nitrate ion but the medium of the reaction becomes basic. Plants prefer a little acidic condition for most species. Therefore it makes plant growth slower. Also one thing to note here is algae find it harder to uptake nitrates compared to ammonia, and due to its stubbornness to get subdued in abundance in ammonia, you will eventually cultivate more algae than the plants itself. Algae are equipped to handle more adverse conditions or water quality than plants and therefore will fully thrive in absense of bio-filtration. Not to mention the fish health concerns and stink in the water in your living room, you could very well live with the waste of a few calories rather than this. In any case bio-filtration is absolutely necessary for a balanced ecosystem in the tank.. You can skip this at your own risk and let us know the results but years of research in this hobby instructs otherwise!
Mithun
M:8583865385
Napoleon Bonaparte wrote:If you want something done in a better way, do it yourself.

My 220Gal reef journal | My 150Gal reef journal
User avatar
mithun
Super Moderator
Super Moderator
 
Posts: 2682
Images: 0
Joined: Tue Mar 20, 2012 11:03 pm
Location: Bangalore.. :(
Has thanked: 4 times
Been thanked: 36 times

Re: DIY Acrylic/Glass Aquarium

Postby Najib » Tue Apr 09, 2013 12:54 pm

I second that what Mithun mentioned regarding bio filtration eliminating algae.

As per my recent experience with the pond, I have come to the conclusion that optimum bio filtration is a must to combat algae in outdoor pond condition. And it is very easy to get green water in outdoor condition. To add to that there have been cases of where one of the best bio media "baki shower system" used to combat algae.

If you are going to experiment it then why not? Do keep us posted.
Najib

***My Fish Eat Your Fish***
User avatar
Najib
Moderator
Moderator
 
Posts: 2959
Images: 3
Joined: Fri Jul 06, 2012 9:53 am
Location: Mumbai/Mangalore
Has thanked: 4 times
Been thanked: 33 times

Re: DIY Acrylic/Glass Aquarium

Postby Subroto » Tue Apr 09, 2013 1:57 pm

mithun wrote:First of all the above statement mostly applies for the terrestrial plants not aquatic.

I would have to refute that statement. My previous post is based on research carried out on aquatic plants only. I would request a reading of the two documents I already mentioned. I would also appreciate if you can point me to any later research that contradicts my point with experimental data.

As regards the point that by removing bio-filtration I would be encouraging algae growth in detriment to the plant health, I have to resort to someone's personal experience as I am yet to put my idea into practice. "In my planted tanks I have been surprised at how little biological filtration is actually required. When I decreased biological filtration (by removing the filter media in the canister filter) I had fewer problems with nitrate accumulation and water acidification. Although nitrification is essential in tanks without plants, it is much less important in planted tanks." (Chapter VII, Plant Nutrition and Ecology, Ecology of the Planted Aquarium by Diana Walstad)

Subroto wrote:You can skip this at your own risk and let us know the results but years of research in this hobby instructs otherwise!


I would definitely give it a try when I get the opportunity but we have progressed since the days of "The Optimum Aquarium" and the latest research does de-emphasize the importance used to be attached to external bio-filtration. Our hobby is perpetually evolving and old 'myths' are continually getting replaced by latest 'facts'.

Gar88 wrote:As per my recent experience with the pond, I have come to the conclusion that optimum bio filtration is a must to combat algae in outdoor pond condition.


Gar88, absolutely. In an outdoor pond, you can perhaps never provide enough higher plants to carry out the job of bio-filtration effectively for the given amount of stagnant water. You have to depend on other methods of bio-filtration. Increase the plant density and you will see a different result.

Subroto
If we work for a living, why do we kill ourselves working?
User avatar
Subroto
New KAC Member
New KAC Member
 
Posts: 20
Joined: Sun Mar 24, 2013 10:47 am
Location: Algiers, Algeria
Has thanked: 0 time
Been thanked: 0 time

Re: DIY Acrylic/Glass Aquarium

Postby mithun » Tue Apr 09, 2013 2:11 pm

great! will wait to see your findings in this experiment.. if you are successful it might actually reduce a lot of investments on filters. Best of luck! ;)
Mithun
M:8583865385
Napoleon Bonaparte wrote:If you want something done in a better way, do it yourself.

My 220Gal reef journal | My 150Gal reef journal
User avatar
mithun
Super Moderator
Super Moderator
 
Posts: 2682
Images: 0
Joined: Tue Mar 20, 2012 11:03 pm
Location: Bangalore.. :(
Has thanked: 4 times
Been thanked: 36 times

Re: DIY Acrylic/Glass Aquarium

Postby sayantan neogi » Tue Apr 09, 2013 2:15 pm

This thread is quite educational for evryone. thanks for the great conversation. looking forward to the actual implementation and hoping to learn a lot more.
“I am like the fish in the aquarium, thinking in a different language, adapting to a life that’s not my natural habitat. I am the people in the other cars, each with his or her own story, but passing too quickly to be noticed or understood.”

- David Levithan (Every Day - 2012)
User avatar
sayantan neogi
Regular in KAC
Regular in KAC
 
Posts: 149
Images: 2
Joined: Sun Nov 18, 2012 4:44 am
Location: Hazra, Kolkata
Has thanked: 1 time
Been thanked: 1 time

Re: DIY Acrylic/Glass Aquarium

Postby Subroto » Tue Apr 09, 2013 2:33 pm

@mithun, thanks. I can't wait to put this into practice and see the results myself! And to be honest to you and to other fellow members who are following this thread, I have my reservations about complete removal of external nitrification ;) But I know I have to give it a sincere try, if I succeed in gradually decreasing external bio-filtration and increasingly depending on my plants to do that job.

@sayantan, thanks. I enjoyed the discussion as much you did! Now, the wait for the opportunity when I can go ahead and carry that out.

Subroto
If we work for a living, why do we kill ourselves working?
User avatar
Subroto
New KAC Member
New KAC Member
 
Posts: 20
Joined: Sun Mar 24, 2013 10:47 am
Location: Algiers, Algeria
Has thanked: 0 time
Been thanked: 0 time

Re: DIY Acrylic/Glass Aquarium

Postby Najib » Tue Apr 09, 2013 4:42 pm

Looking forward here. Maybe so me sort of design on the sump will shed some light into the plan here ;).

Not sure we discussed. what the stocking gonna be?
Najib

***My Fish Eat Your Fish***
User avatar
Najib
Moderator
Moderator
 
Posts: 2959
Images: 3
Joined: Fri Jul 06, 2012 9:53 am
Location: Mumbai/Mangalore
Has thanked: 4 times
Been thanked: 33 times

Re: DIY Acrylic/Glass Aquarium

Postby subhendu421 » Fri Oct 13, 2017 5:23 pm

Mithun da and others

I am new to this forum , but not new to this hobby. I am in ths hobby for last 6 years.

But presently i need to build 4.5 x 1.5 x 1.5 planted aquarium with ultra clear float glass of 8 mm. I looked today for glass at Metro gali. But nobody could give me ultra clear glass.

Where can I find it in Kolkata?

I stay in Dum Dum
subhendu421
New KAC Member
New KAC Member
 
Posts: 40
Joined: Wed Sep 06, 2017 2:47 am
Has thanked: 0 time
Been thanked: 2 times

Re: DIY Acrylic/Glass Aquarium

Postby mithun » Tue Oct 24, 2017 9:21 am

in a 4.5x1.5x1.5 you may have enough internal surfaces itself to do lots of bio filtration by itself. A good overall waterflow is all you will need to keep it healthy if your stocking level is low. It all depends on how much waste your fishes and plants together generates. Many run their planted tanks without any external filter and just a little power head for water movement. No biggie there.
Mithun
M:8583865385
Napoleon Bonaparte wrote:If you want something done in a better way, do it yourself.

My 220Gal reef journal | My 150Gal reef journal
User avatar
mithun
Super Moderator
Super Moderator
 
Posts: 2682
Images: 0
Joined: Tue Mar 20, 2012 11:03 pm
Location: Bangalore.. :(
Has thanked: 4 times
Been thanked: 36 times

Previous

Return to DIY Projects

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest